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Mad Dog Cooking Class Series: Effects on Dietary Self-efficacy, Eating Behaviors and Health Outcomes

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05934968
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : July 7, 2023
Last Update Posted : July 7, 2023
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
David Ditor, Brock University

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE June 29, 2023
First Posted Date  ICMJE July 7, 2023
Last Update Posted Date July 7, 2023
Estimated Study Start Date  ICMJE September 2023
Estimated Primary Completion Date June 2024   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: July 6, 2023)
  • Custom-designed task self-efficacy questionnaire [ Time Frame: Baseline (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Confidence in one's abilities to adhere to the anti-inflammatory diet. This is a 4-item questionnaire that asks how confident participants are about adhering to the diet for certain amounts of time at certain percentages of adherence. Each item is scored from 1 (not confident at all) to 7 (completely confident). The minimum score is 4 and the maximum score is 28, and higher scores indicate greater self-efficacy.
  • Custom-designed task self-efficacy questionnaire [ Time Frame: 6-week timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Confidence in one's abilities to adhere to the anti-inflammatory diet. This is a 4-item questionnaire that asks how confident participants are about adhering to the diet for certain amounts of time at certain percentages of adherence. Each item is scored from 1 (not confident at all) to 7 (completely confident). The minimum score is 4 and the maximum score is 28, and higher scores indicate greater self-efficacy.
  • Custom-designed task self-efficacy questionnaire [ Time Frame: 6-month follow-up timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Confidence in one's abilities to adhere to the anti-inflammatory diet. This is a 4-item questionnaire that asks how confident participants are about adhering to the diet for certain amounts of time at certain percentages of adherence. Each item is scored from 1 (not confident at all) to 7 (completely confident). The minimum score is 4 and the maximum score is 28, and higher scores indicate greater self-efficacy.
  • Custom-designed barrier self-efficacy questionnaire [ Time Frame: Baseline (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Confidence in one's ability to overcome the barriers associated with adhering to anti-inflammatory diet. This is a 5-item questionnaire that asks participants how confident they are about overcoming the barriers associated with adhering to the anti-inflammatory diet. Each item is scored from 1 (not confident at all) to 7 (completely confident). The minimum score is 5 and the maximum score is 35, and higher scores indicate greater self-efficacy.
  • Custom-designed barrier self-efficacy questionnaire [ Time Frame: 6-week timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Confidence in one's ability to overcome the barriers associated with adhering to anti-inflammatory diet. This is a 5-item questionnaire that asks participants how confident they are about overcoming the barriers associated with adhering to the anti-inflammatory diet. Each item is scored from 1 (not confident at all) to 7 (completely confident). The minimum score is 5 and the maximum score is 35, and higher scores indicate greater self-efficacy.
  • Custom-designed barrier self-efficacy questionnaire [ Time Frame: 6-month follow-up timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Confidence in one's ability to overcome the barriers associated with adhering to anti-inflammatory diet. This is a 5-item questionnaire that asks participants how confident they are about overcoming the barriers associated with adhering to the anti-inflammatory diet. Each item is scored from 1 (not confident at all) to 7 (completely confident). The minimum score is 5 and the maximum score is 35, and higher scores indicate greater self-efficacy.
  • Adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet [ Time Frame: Baseline (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Participants will complete a 7-day food log. Food logs are then analyzed for the number of servings the participant ate that were approved on the anti-inflammatory diet, the number of servings that were not allowed (cheats) and the total servings eaten over the 7 days. Adherence rates are then determined by calculating [(servings allowed/total servings) * 100.
  • Adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet [ Time Frame: 6-week timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Participants will complete a 7-day food log. Food logs are then analyzed for the number of servings the participant ate that were approved on the anti-inflammatory diet, the number of servings that were not allowed (cheats) and the total servings eaten over the 7 days. Adherence rates are then determined by calculating [(servings allowed/total servings) * 100.
  • Adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet [ Time Frame: 6-month follow-up timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Participants will complete a 7-day food log. Food logs are then analyzed for the number of servings the participant ate that were approved on the anti-inflammatory diet, the number of servings that were not allowed (cheats) and the total servings eaten over the 7 days. Adherence rates are then determined by calculating [(servings allowed/total servings) * 100.
  • Custom-designed consumer satisfaction questionnaire [ Time Frame: 6-week timepoint (for the intervention group only) ]
    Consumer satisfaction with the Mad Dog cooking class series will be measured on a custom designed questionnaire containing 10 items scored on a 7-point scale (1 = strongly disagree, 7 = strongly agree; ex: I feel that I learned new and helpful information in the Mad Dog cooking class series). The minimum score on this questionnaire is 10 and the maximum score is 70, with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction.
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Same as current
Change History No Changes Posted
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: July 6, 2023)
  • Depression as determined by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies depression (CES-D) [ Time Frame: Baseline (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Depression as determined by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies depression (CES-D) This is a 20-item questionnaire that asks participants to rate their depressive symptoms over the last 7 days, and each item is scored from 0-3. The minimum score for the questionnaire 0 and the maximum score is 60, with higher scores indicating worse depressive symptomology. Any score above 15 is indicative of clinical depression, but should not be taken as a diagnosis by itself.
  • Depression as determined by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies depression (CES-D) [ Time Frame: 6-week timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Depression as determined by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies depression (CES-D) This is a 20-item questionnaire that asks participants to rate their depressive symptoms over the last 7 days, and each item is scored from 0-3. The minimum score for the questionnaire 0 and the maximum score is 60, with higher scores indicating worse depressive symptomology. Any score above 15 is indicative of clinical depression, but should not be taken as a diagnosis by itself.
  • Depression as determined by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies depression (CES-D) [ Time Frame: 6-month follow-up timepoint (for the intervention group and the control group) ]
    Depression as determined by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies depression (CES-D) This is a 20-item questionnaire that asks participants to rate their depressive symptoms over the last 7 days, and each item is scored from 0-3. The minimum score for the questionnaire 0 and the maximum score is 60, with higher scores indicating worse depressive symptomology. Any score above 15 is indicative of clinical depression, but should not be taken as a diagnosis by itself.
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Same as current
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Mad Dog Cooking Class Series: Effects on Dietary Self-efficacy, Eating Behaviors and Health Outcomes
Official Title  ICMJE The Effects of the 6-week Mad Dog Anti-inflammatory Cooking Class Series on Dietary Self-efficacy, Eating Behaviors and Health Outcomes in People With Neurological Disability
Brief Summary

Spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both conditions characterized by chronic inflammation as indicated by elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines can have a wide array of negative impacts such as increasing the risk of depression and the intensity and frequency of neuropathic pain.

Recent work in the investigator's laboratory has shown that a 3-month anti-inflammatory diet is not only effective in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also in reducing depression and neuropathic pain, by approximately 55% and 40%, respectively. However, a one-year follow-up study from the investigator's lab showed such adherence to be very challenging and therefore, strategies are required to address barriers to healthy eating in those with neurological disability.

Accordingly, the investigators have developed a modified anti-inflammatory diet (Mad Dog diet) that is more palatable, less expensive and less demanding, as well as a 2-part pre-diet consultation that effectively increased self-efficacy for dietary adherence, and actual adherence one month post-consult. Still, participant feedback suggests that further efforts are needed to help ensure long term adherence to anti-inflammatory diets for those with neurological disability.

As such, the investigators have developed the 6-week Mad Dog cooking series. This series consists of a once-weekly cooking class and educational session where a group of individuals with neuromuscular disability can come together to learn about the health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet, receive instruction on how to cook selected anti-inflammatory recipes, and experiment with various pieces of accessible kitchen equipment that may increase their meal preparation skills.

The purpose of this study is to test the 6-week Mad Dog cooking series in individuals with neuromuscular disability to gauge consumer satisfaction and make preliminary measures on self-efficacy for adhering to the Mad Dog anti-inflammatory diet, as well as actual adherence 6 months after the series has been completed. The investigators will also determine if the series has any effect on depressive symptoms.

Detailed Description

As mentioned above, the Mad Dog cooking series consists of 6 once-weekly cooking classes and educational sessions where a group of individuals with neuromuscular disability can come together to learn about the health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet, receive instruction on how to cook selected anti-inflammatory recipes, and experiment with various pieces of accessible kitchen equipment that may increase their meal preparation skills. These classes will take place in the kitchen in the Brock Research and Innovation Centre (130 Lockhart Drive) which is a completely accessible building. The classes will be led by a Brock University graduate student and take approximately 90 minutes each, and each class will have a different theme (See below). This series will also allow participants to share a meal together once per week which the investigators expect (based on past feedback) to foster a sense of community and belonging, improve mood and increase the likelihood of long term adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet.

Schedule:

Week 1: Introduction to Anti-Inflammatory Eating (Veggies and Pita with Mad Dog Hummus, Mad Dog Thai Curry, Mad Dog Nut Mix) Week 2: Focus on Breakfast (Chocolate Protein Smoothie, Poached Eggs Potato Hash and Wilted Kale, Overnight Oats) Week 3: Healthy Flavors of the Globe (Baked Plantain and Sweet Potato Chips, Lentil Tacos with rice and beans, Sugarless Sticky Toffee Pudding) Week 4: Tribute to Canada (Split Pea Soup, Chicken Tourtière with roasted veggies, Nanaimo Bars) Week 5: Anti-Inflammatory Powerhouses (Green Juice, Chicken Breast with Kale and Wild Rice Salad, Turmeric Coconut Bites) Week 6: Protein Positive (White Bean Dip with veggies and crackers, Vegetarian Chili, Sweet Potato Protein Pudding)

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Not Applicable
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Condition  ICMJE
  • Spinal Cord Injuries
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Diet, Healthy
  • Inflammation
  • Depression
  • Adherence, Treatment
Intervention  ICMJE Other: Mad Dog cooking class series
This 6-week series consists of a once-weekly cooking class and educational session where a group of individuals with neuromuscular disability can come together to learn about the health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet, receive instruction on how to cook selected anti-inflammatory recipes, and experiment with various pieces of accessible kitchen equipment that may increase their meal preparation skills. This series will also allow participants to share a meal together once per week.
Study Arms  ICMJE
  • Experimental: Mad Dog cooking class intervention group
    This 6-week series consists of a once-weekly cooking class and educational session where a group of individuals with neuromuscular disability can come together to learn about the health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet, receive instruction on how to cook selected anti-inflammatory recipes, and experiment with various pieces of accessible kitchen equipment that may increase their meal preparation skills. This series will also allow participants to share a meal together once per week.
    Intervention: Other: Mad Dog cooking class series
  • No Intervention: Control group
    The control group will be given the Mad Dog recipes but will not take part in the Mad Dog cooking class series.
Publications * Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Not yet recruiting
Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: July 6, 2023)
14
Original Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE Same as current
Estimated Study Completion Date  ICMJE August 2024
Estimated Primary Completion Date June 2024   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria:

  • To be eligible for this study, participants are required to be over 18 years of age, fluent in English and at least one year removed from either spinal cord injury (SCI) or diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants with SCI can have any level or severity of injury while participants with MS can have had any type of MS.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Younger than 18
  • Not fluent in English
  • No SCI or diagnosis of MS
Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE No
Contacts  ICMJE
Contact: David S Ditor, PhD 905-688-5550 ext 5338 dditor@brocku.ca
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE Canada
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT05934968
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE 22-337 - Ditor
Has Data Monitoring Committee No
U.S. FDA-regulated Product
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE
Plan to Share IPD: No
Plan Description: Available upon reasonable request to the Principal Investigator
Current Responsible Party David Ditor, Brock University
Original Responsible Party Same as current
Current Study Sponsor  ICMJE Brock University
Original Study Sponsor  ICMJE Same as current
Collaborators  ICMJE Not Provided
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: David S Ditor, PhD Brock University
PRS Account Brock University
Verification Date July 2023

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP